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Contact Minnesota Tile & Stone for Backsplash Tile in Burnsville , Bathroom Tile in Burnsville , Ceramic Tile in Burnsville , Countertops in Burnsville , Floor Tile in Burnsville , Flooring in Burnsville , Glass Tile in Burnsville , Granite in Burnsville , Granite Countertops in Burnsville , Kitchen Flooring in Burnsville , Marble in Burnsville , Mosaic Tile in Burnsville , Porcelain Tile in Burnsville , Quartz Countertops in Burnsville , Stone in Burnsville , Tile in Burnsville , Tile Flooring in Burnsville , Tile Shop in Burnsville , Tile Store in Burnsville , Tiles in Burnsville , and in surrounding areas.

Below is some general information about Burnsville :

Burnsville is a city 15 miles (24 km) south of downtown Minneapolis in Dakota County in the U.S. state of Minnesota. The city lies on the south bank of the Minnesota River, upstream from the confluence with the Mississippi River. Burnsville and nearby suburbs form the southern portion of MinneapolisÐSaint Paul, the fifteenth largest metropolitan area in the United States, with about 3.6 million residents. According to the 2010 United States Census, the population is 60,306. Known in the metro area for its regional mall, Burnsville Center, the city is also a recreational attraction with Alimagnet Dog Park, a section of Murphy-Hanrehan Park Reserve, and 310-foot (94 m) vertical ski peak Buck Hill. Minnesota River wildlife is protected by the Minnesota Valley National Wildlife Refuge.

Originally a rural Irish farming community, Burnsville became the tenth largest Minnesotan city in the 2000 Census following the construction of Interstate 35. Currently the sixth largest suburb in the metro area and a bedroom community of both Minneapolis and Saint Paul, the city was fully built by the late 2000s. Burnsville has been building a downtown area called Heart of the City with urban-style retail and condominiums. The Burnsville Transit Station serves as the hub and headquarters of the Minnesota Valley Transit Authority, providing regional bus service to five other suburbs. The name Burnsville is attributed to an early Irish settler and land owner, William Byrne. His surname was recorded as “Burns” and was never corrected.

Fed by receding glaciers and Lake Agassiz 12,000 years ago, the Glacial River Warren carved today’s Minnesota River valley. On the northern border of Burnsville, the Minnesota River winds through marshland and flood plains toward its confluence with the Mississippi. Most of the river is in the Minnesota Valley National Wildlife Refuge with fish, wildlife, and parkland managed collectively by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources. Burnsville also contains the Black Dog and Lower Minnesota River Watershed Districts managed by the Dakota County Soil and Water Conservation District. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 26.93 square miles, of which 24.91 square miles is land and 2.02 square miles is water. Interstate Highway 35 splits into Interstate Highways 35W and 35E within the city. Other routes in the city include Minnesota Highway 13 and County Road 42.

As of the census of 2010, there were 60,306 people, 24,283 households, and 15,656 families residing in the city. The population density was 2,421.0 inhabitants per square mile. There were 25,759 housing units at an average density of 1,034.1 per square mile. The racial makeup of the city was 77.5% White, 10.0% African American, 0.4% Native American, 5.0% Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 3.5% from other races, and 3.5% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 7.9% of the population.

Burnsville is a fully developed suburban bedroom community. Large pockets of ramblers and split-level houses were due to Interstate 35W’s completion in the 1960s which came earlier than most of the metro highways. Burnsville through the 1990s filled in the last of its available land with upscale housing stock and apartment complexes. In the 2000s Burnsville went under redevelopment activity, producing many four-story residential buildings. The “Heart of the City”, a new downtown area, contains mixed-use residential and retail buildings. This has produced a diverse range of housing types from single-family homes to high-density condominiums. Since the city was developed in a sprawl fashion, new and old buildings sit between each other. The original industrial area along the Minnesota River is mostly abandoned, and also contains a sealed land-fill site. The new industrial area in the west side of the city contains many manufacturing and corporate headquarters as well as large modern warehouses. West of the new downtown area are new office buildings, where one tower reaches above ten stories.

Source: Burnsville on Wikipedia